All About Orange Wine

Orange wine is a bit of a misnomer. It is not wine made with oranges, nor is it a Mimosa cocktail ( a blend of 1 part orange juice to 2 parts sparkling wine.) Orange wine is something entirely different. 

 What is an Orange Wine? Orange wine is a type of white wine made by leaving the grape skins and seeds in contact with the juice, creating a deep orange-hued finished product.

What is Orange Wine?

What is Orange Wine by Wine Folly

 

To make an orange wine, you first take white grapes, mash them up, and then put them in a large vessel (often cement or ceramic). Then, you typically leave the fermenting grapes alone for four days to sometimes over a year with the skins and seeds still attached.

 

Orange winemaking is a very natural process that uses little to no additives, sometimes not even yeast. Because of all this, they taste very different from regular white wines and have a sour taste and nuttiness from oxidation.

Let’s thank Simon Woolf over at Decanter,  who found out that the term “Orange Wine” was coined by British wine importer David Harvey at Raeburn Fine Wine . He used it to describe this non-interventionist style of white winemaking.

You may also hear the term “Ramato,” which means “auburn,” in Italian and typically refers to Italian Pinot Grigio made in an orange wine style.

What Does It Taste Like?

The taste of orange wine

 

Orange wines have been described as robust and bold, with honeyed aromas of jackfruit (a fleshy tropical fruit), hazelnut, brazil nut, bruised apple, wood varnish, linseed oil, juniper, sourdough, and dried orange rind.

On the palate, they’re big, dry, and even have tannin like a red wine with a sourness similar to fruit beer. Often they’re so intense that you might want to make sure you’re sitting down when you taste your first orange wine.

 TIP: The deep color of orange wine comes from lignin in grapeseeds.
 

Food Pairing with Orange Wines

 Food pairing with Orange Wines by Slovenian producer Klinec

Because of their boldness, orange wines pair excellently well with equally bold foods, including curry dishes, Moroccan cuisine, Ethiopian cuisine (like those spongelike pancakes called Injera), Korean dishes with fermented kimchi (bibim bap), and traditional Japanese cuisine, including fermented soybeans (Natto). Due to the high phenolic content (tannin and bitterness) and the nutty tartness they exhibit, orange wines pair with a wide variety of meats, ranging from beef to fish.

 

For more about Orange Wine visit https://winefolly.com/blog/